Archives for Candidates

Differentiators

Have you given much thought to the impact that differentiators have in your business or your daily life? Those are the sometimes subtle, or sometimes ‘in-your face’ things, that help each of us to make decisions through-out the days and weeks ahead.

A differentiator might be the color of a dress or the pattern on a necktie so far as clothing goes.  It might be the sweep of a body panel on that new automobile, or the interior trim option that you just had to have.  Differentiators can either be subtle or ‘in-your-face’.

WFA Staffing relies on differentiators every day.

We seek out those differences between various candidates that make the choice of one versus another apparent.  At the same time, we rely on differences to break ties between candidates.  Whether you think about that or not, they likely are part of your decision-making process as well as ours.

  It is for this reason that we pay a lot of attention to meeting you, our customer, on your turf.

We want to get to know you and your business.  Every business has a different something about it that resonates, which sets it apart from all the others in that same business.  Our visits in the field tell us a lot about the types of candidates that will fare better for each organization.

We strive to better understand who you are and what your company is and that is an immense help as we screen candidates, a number of whom are likely to have the qualifications but one or two of whom are simply better-suited for your needs in our opinion.  That is the real ‘magic’ of this business if there is any magic to it.  This also helps us save you time; we have gone through the process of sifting and winnowing and arrived at those who best fit the needs.

Our staff has years of experience in this differentiating process.  Visits with you on your ground help us to hone in on just the right set of attributes in the numerous people we interview.  Most of this experience is subtle; it is simply the way we do our ‘thing’ since it has proved to be best for us and our clients (both employers and prospective employees).  You might not be able to place your finger on it, but it is there nonetheless.

We look forward to the next opportunity you provide us in which we can show you how differentiation works to your benefit, too.

 
Al Campbell

 

 

 

 

Loyalty is a Two-Way Street

“Loyalty is a two-way street. If I ‘m asking for it from you, then you’re getting it from me”-  Harvey Specter

In today’s fast moving market employee and employer loyalty is more important than ever. Are you taking the necessary steps to attract and retain the best talent available? As employers we all face similar challenges with the workforce today. Candidates are lacking the basic life skills to compete in this ever-changing job market.

Candidates seem unaware of how to  dress for an interview, complete a math test on our application, or create a resume. Some  lack job stability, basic communication skills, or the necessary transportation to remain reliable. We are now finding candidates no longer providing proper notice to their current employer.  In this market they can quickly move from one position to another.

When we do find the right person to invest in and train, we expect them to be loyal.  Ask yourself, are we in turn loyal to them?

What do we owe a new employee other than what was promised during the interview?  Maybe, if we established a scorecard during that interview, we could both work jointly to have the new hire grow as an employee while we grow as a desired employer.  This can be a two-way street and that is good for both parties. This environment, not often found in today’s hectic workplaces, would cement the bond between us and our new employee.

As we know, opportunity is plentiful, so it is very important we are doing the very best we can to attract and retain talent.  What is a fair salary or hourly wage for the position?   WFA Staffing Group specializes in staffing and executive placement services by providing entry level through executive recruiting services.  Part of our job is to be a good sounding board for our employer clients.  We have a good feel for what the hot buttons of job seekers are today.

For general production opportunities we have found the days of paying $10 per hour seem to be winding down. With the current demand to fill open positions it is a job-seekers market. Offering a fair wage based on shift, skill level, distance the candidate is required to travel, and the position itself will not only attract the best talent available but it will keep them from searching elsewhere once they have accepted the opportunity to join your team.

Remember the hype that has accompanied the news about FoxConn.  That has penetrated both employers thinking as well as prospective employee thinking.  There will continue to be churn in the marketplace, deserved or not, simply because there is about to be a FoxConn next door.

Most employees are truly seeking an opportunity to learn and expand their knowledge and want to work for an organization that will offer long term training for personal and professional growth.

We know this doesn’t apply to all employees. We try to ferret out those before even exposing you to them.  That is an advantage we may have due to  experience we’ve gained over the years.

Successful employers offer job stability, long term professional training, and strong benefit and retirement packages.

Where that might have been a bit unusual in prior years, it is true in the vast majority of companies today.  The largest percentage of employees today, other than for day job/temp employees, are thinking about the longer term.   Including them in long term goals to make them feel a part of the bigger picture can be a good investment made at very low cost.  Periodically taking a careful look at where you are so far as employee relationships can pay big dividends.  That is especially true in today’s world with industry having major growth pains that will only be added to by the FoxConns in the arena.  Are you doing all you can to hold on to your good employees? We’ll be happy to help you in that process.


Roberta Murphy
Roberta Murphy, Vice-President

Now Hiring: Where Are All the People?

Where are all the people coming from to fill the needs of employers in this market today?

Truth be told, there are difficulties even for us professionals to find the right people for the open positions our client employers have available.  That is no secret.  There are more openings than qualified applicants.  We’ve been through this before so it simply requires us to use different approaches and to condense time frames.

This is a two-pronged situation.

First, for those who are well qualified, this might be a golden opportunity to consider a change in your employment.

That is true almost without regard to what your skill set and experience might include.  If you are good at what you do, and if you have a solid track record, this is likely the opportune time to see what is available.  We can help you.  Call or stop in today!

If you are an employer who needs qualified talent to help you continue to grow your business, this is a good time to look even though this market is relatively tight.  There is good talent available especially for some skill sets BUT you will need to be ready to pull the trigger quickly when Ms. or Mr. Right appears.  A tight doesn’t mean an impossible market; but it does mean that we have to be able to close the deal more quickly than was the case six to eight months ago.  Candidates and employers are now moving more rapidly while still touching all the right bases.

True, employers are finding it tough to locate the right people today and to do that in a relatively short time frame.  Our team of talent scouts is good but they do not walk on water…at least not very often.  The sooner you can alert us to a coming need, the better for you, the candidates and us.

Unemployment is obviously standing at 3%.

There is a diminished talent pool.  Both statements are true.  We have found that these tight times can be some of the most lucrative for all parties.  It is good for employees seeking to make their move.  It is good for employers who have needs in such a hot market.  Both feel the need for a stepped up pace in the search, interview and offer/closing stages.  Foot dragging is not often a problem today.

We encourage you to look starting today, even if your plans call for bringing a new hire on are 30 to 60 or more days down the road.

Do your best to anticipate future needs today and let us begin the search process sooner.  We will still apply our usual critical reviews of references and so on.  Just because the market is a little tighter, mistakes simply can’t be tolerated in the search and hiring process.

We encourage prospective candidates to recognize that even with more openings today than is normal, finding the right spot rather than simply the next spot is even more critical than it has ever been.  We’re in the business of helping both sides especially in times such as these.  The value of our service increases in tight times.

 

Fred D'Amato

 

Fred D’Amato, President

The Saga of the Job Interview…


The saga of the Job Interview…

This phrase conjures up different thoughts for different people. The person being interviewed thinks about not making any serious gaffes.  The person conducting the interview thinks about not making any serious mistakes in the process of interviewing the prospective employee.

The result of these two sets of dynamics can be problematic even though both the interviewer and the interviewee felt they’d been at the top of their game during the interview.  The interviewer made sure to avoid causing the interviewee any discomfort during the interview and felt the process had gone well.

The interviewee felt he or she had done an excellent job of not making any serious errors during the interview.  True, he or she might’ve played a couple of games during the interview but that wouldn’t matter after he or she had been awarded the new position.  A little misdirection here and a bit of a falsehood there weren’t the end of the world, after all.

So, two relatively well-meaning people met and got along just fine.  They smiled at one and other, were courteous, received good answers or provided safe answers that seemed to fill the bill.  There weren’t a lot of people applying and there was pressure to fill the spot.

So, this interview led to an offer.  This led to an acceptance, which led to a termination a couple months later.

The approach used given the tight applicant market had only served to bring the interviewer back to filling that same position.  The person, who was released or had resigned, blemished his or her employment record given the short period of time in that job.

Enter WFA Staffing and its professional people people.  We interview as a profession, not as an interruption to the day’s usual routine.  We are good at what we do because that is what we do.  Our interviewing is an integral part of our day, not an interruption to be dealt with as quickly as possible.  We are tuned in to the people we work with as well as to the clients for whom we recruit.  This is what we do, all day every day of the work week.

You may think us a little strange. Our recruiters like what we do; we think it is a great profession and are happy to do that work. WFA strives to satisfy our client employers as well as being helpful to the people seeking employment.  And yes, we have likely heard most all the stories and our antennae are ever alert for the parts of the story that need further verification.

That’s what we do for our clients.  And if you’re not yet a WFA Staffing client, that’s what we’d love to do for you and your business.

Fred D'Amato

 

Fred D’Amato, President

 

The Power of Optimism

optimism-1 Optimistic people fare better in interviews all other things being equal. That is the simple truth. Most people like people who have optimism, so long as it isn’t exaggerated and overblown simply for effect.

Optimism and smiles tend to go together. (See our recent entry http://wfastaffing.com/smile/ ) So there is a double-whammy in the package of a person interviewing for a position who is both optimistic and who has a ready smile; those people usually will have a better experience sometimes because they expected to have a better experience.If we are self-confidant without being overbearing, and we couple that with optimism and a sense of humor, the odds are in our favor if we have the work-related qualification the employer seeks.  This might seem too simple to really have an impact, but it does have an impact.  This combination is sort of the ‘holy grail’ for prospective employers, or the trifecta that simply doesn’t present itself too often.

If you are one of these people, you have probably been quite successful and you might not even understand why, or you may never have given it a thought because life has always been good.

So, what about the person who hasn’t experienced this before?  Is all lost for that person?  Certainly not, but you have to become aware of those things that can help you with optimism in the interview.

You need to have self-confidence; that is hard to fake.

You have very solid attributes. You need to take inventory of those and be sure you make use of them.  A ready smile is valuable.  A good self-image is important.  If you need to buy a new outfit for the interview, maybe that is a good investment if it helps you feel better about yourself.

You need to have a download-3positive view of yourself, without being egotistical, and about the world around you, and recognize and convey that you are a good person, and would be a valuable employee, if this proves to be the right setting.  You need to have your ‘elevator speech’ prepared.  What in the world is an elevator speech?  It is that 45 to 60 second talk that tells who you are and why you think you can be a value to this employer.  You may review your education and experience in short, succinct bites. And don’t forget about your personality and values.  It needs to feel natural and to be ready to be provided every time you encounter a new person or new situation. Maybe it is better thought of as the response to the interviewer’s request:  “tell me a little about yourself”.

Self-confidence and optioptimism-is-the-faith-that-leads-to-achievementmism about who you are will go a long way toward a favorable interview experience and for your future.

Al Campbell, Account Executive

 

 

Authenticity- Be yourself!

Be-yourself-in-a-worldAuthenticity is important.  Authenticity in interviews is very important.  What is authenticity?   How can we be authentic in interviews?  It is actually quite easy to define.

We define interview authenticity as you being you in the interview.

You are who you are. You have hair of a certain color; you are so many inches tall; you weigh so many pounds, you talk the way you talk, and your attitudes and experience are what they are.  That is the authentic you.  Authenticity is not something you can conjure up for specific occurrences such as an interview.  Too often, we have seen the situation where a person studies all he or she can about the company with which they are about to interview.  Is that a bad thing?  Absolutely not; you ought to learn as much as possible about your prospective employer before you interview.  But you should not try to be someone you are not and never have been.

Being authentic during the interview simply means that you act like yourself.

You don’t create some new version of yourself because you think that might work better for you during the interview.  You might be able to fool the interviewer once in a great while, but even then what have you gained?  The company thinks they have hired a person who doesn’t really exist.  You cannot be someone other than who you really are.  Actors and actresses play roles but that is only for the time they are onstage or in front of the camera.  You cannot play a role as an employee for 40 or more hours a week and for 50 weeks out of the year with two weeks of vacation to be your real self.

It is important tauthentic-self-picture-quotehat you be your real self during interviews.  That is how you achieve authenticity in the interview.  If the employer isn’t willing to hire the real you, then you are spared having to act the part of someone different for the rest of your career with that employer.  You know that would be impossible, but it is amazing how many times people who are seeking a new position are tempted to do just that.  There can be a lot of pressure to land that new job.  Bills are piling up; your spouse is counting on it; you need that ideal position to feel good about yourself.

But, no matter how rough the situation might be, do not fall into the trap of trying to act like a different person because you think that’ll get the offer to come your way.  It will almost always do just the opposite.  Even if that acting works once in a while, you would be miserable from the first day on.

Be yourself.  Walk the way you walk.  Talk the way you talk.  Tell the truth about your experience and education.  Act the way you’d want to be able to act if you were hired.  Be the real you; that is authenticity in the interview.

Tom Krist

 

 

Tom Krist, CEO

 

The Early Bird Gets the Talent…

your hired'

Hire early for best results.  This seems a recurring theme for a WFA Staffing Blog, but that is the case for a reason:  there is a shortage of qualified people seeking positions as has been the case off and on for the past year.  We find candidates who have interviewed and made favorable impressions not being available any longer after a wait of only a week to ten days.  This seems more and more to be the ‘new normal’.  Frankly, we had expected this to be a passing phenomenon since we have seen that pattern before, but this seems to be more widespread and of longer duration than we’ve experienced in a long time.So consider a new hiring strategy…

If there is one message that seems to be apparent, it is this:  when you find a qualified person who seems to be a great fit for your organization, you may want to consider expediting your normal hiring timeline.  The chances are increasing that this person may no longer be available when you decide to pull the trigger.  That has happened to us several times very recently.

As we stated at the beginning of this blog, what has been the case in select categories now appears to be the case almost across the board.  Obviously, those positions with stiffer qualification and experience requirements might remain open for a bit longer, but the qualified candidates for those higher level positions seem to also have more choices.

The early bird indeed is coming away with the deal.

Talent is in the driver’s seat today and the talent we see does not seem hesitant to make life-altering decisions very quickly when the ‘right person and the right employer’ find each other.  Consider free agency; the top athletes usually receive immediate offers and are not left ‘on the market’ very long.  It is the wise employer who recognizes this market and alters the process accordingly in order to bring the right people on board.

As always, we are here to help and part of that help in today’s market is the advice you have just read.  If we seem to be pushing a bit, please understand that we are trying to help you avoid being disappointed.  Open positions, or under-performing employees, are costly to any business.

Fred D'Amato

Fred D’Amato, President

 

Is it time to shorten your hiring process?

Help wanted Our last WFA Blog dealt with what is being called the ‘Silver Tsunami’ and the impact that is having on employers as retirements take valued skill sets off the market.  The State of Wisconsin has released its latest figures showing a total of more than 94,000 open positions across Wisconsin at this time.  This includes all types of positions.  That is coupled with a relatively low unemployment rate of 4.4% in Wisconsin again across all types of positions.

We have seen a lengthening of the recruiting process in our world, and we have seen a near-critical shortage of available candidates in certain specialized areas of employment.  The indication is that this tight market may continue for some time to come, especially in certain specialized areas of employment.  Given this somewhat unique employment environment, we offer some thoughts about how employers might avoid having open positions for long periods of time:

First, the days of having ample time to think about making an offer seem to be drawing to a close in many sectors.  There are segments of the workforce where offers are now being seen at the time of the initial interview or very soon after that point.  That is occurring in most sectors of employment even including certain of the more highly skilled positions, which is a bit unusual, and seems driven generally by the sparsity of candidates.

If you are able, when you see a good candidate, you may need to make a decision, at least by the following day or two.  If you are able, you may find it beneficial to think of extending an offer to Job offera candidate that has 80-90% of what you seek where you might’ve delayed prior to this time thinking you’d see a better candidate soon.  The decision can be likened to a Hobson’s choice of “taking what is available or nothing at all” as that term is defined.  Neither is particularly good but one is probably better than the other in any given situation.  You are the only one who can make that decision.  We’ll continue to seek the best candidates for each job order.

 

Tom Krist, President

Tom Krist

Silver Tsunami

happy-retirement-150x150We hear about the impact millennials (those typically with birth years from the early 1980’s to the early 2000’s) are having and will continue to have on the workforce.  But, there is another phenomenon that has been given the name “silver tsunami”, and that is the growing segment of employees nearing or at retirement age, and concerning just what impact the loss of that experience pool will have going forward.

Employers are faced with ‘silver tsunami’ issues such as who will retire and those who will want to continue working, and what those decisions will do to employee benefit practices for example.  If you haven’t given any thought to this, you might wish to engage your employee benefits broker or consultant to begin the planning for this possibility.

There is another very intriguing aspect to this ‘silver tsunami’ wave, and that centers in our world, the world of employment and recruitment.  ‘Silver tsunami’ workers have significant organizational wisdom that might be lost upon their retirement. Silver tsunami 34 There is also the intriguing potential for employers needing skilled talent no matter the age, to focus some recruiting efforts on the ‘silver tsunami’ group.

There are ‘supply issues’ in the current employee talent pool and you probably know that as well as we do.  There are simply too few qualified people available in certain fields to meet today’s demand.  The ‘silver tsunami’ group might provide part of the solution.  Recruiting in that pool may provide more talent and better availability if the attained age is not a problem for the hiring employer.

We need to review our recruiting practices to assure that we can find those who may have ‘aged out’ in one company while they still want and need to work.  A recent Society for Human Resource Management and Sloan Foundation survey found that 66% of HR professionals said their organizations now employ older workers who have retired from other organizations or careers.  Of those people being hired from that pool, 58% said they went to work after retirement because they enjoyed it and needed to find something to do with all the time they suddenly had available.  Another 45% said their reasons centered on health care benefits.

Obviously, millennials are very important, but we need to be reminded not to lose sight of the value to be found among those in the ‘silver tsunami’.

 

Tom Krist, President

Tom Krist

Politics as Usual

thGEO34GX5   As if you weren’t already aware, we are in the midst of a prolonged political season that already shows signs of deep emotional investment by people on both sides of the aisle.  Given 17 current presidential candidates in one party alone, there is plenty about which to disagree even in a single political party.  We have enough issues in our day-to-day business operations to keep us all on our toes without introducing something as potentially volatile as politics.

A Packer-Bear rivalry can sometimes be fun in a workplace environment because we seldom are as deeply committed to a football team as we can become to a particular politician.  Differing political views, while healthy and normal are simply not desirable for display in a work setting.

Many of us are very committed to our political party or candidate of choice and are active in those events and in supporting the candidates of our choosing.  Even then, we are wise to avoid politics in our respective businesses because that can lead to dysfunction.  And dysfunction is the opposite of what we all strive to create.

The staffing business is especially prone to these kinds of disagreements since our ‘product’ is people, and our customers are people and it is people who have political opinions.  If we were to display political banners or wear political buttons in the workplace, we’d likely lose a few candidates or customers if not more.  And we’d probably lose them for a long time since those memories stay with us for a long time.

So we, understandably, are more tuned in to this kind of thing but it can be just as concerning in a warehouse or on a factory floor or within a sales force.  There is more than enough in the normal course of things that can produce workplace angst without adding fuel to the mixture.

Now to work at practicing what has just been preached…

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Alan Campbell, Account Executive