Archives for interview

Differentiators

Have you given much thought to the impact that differentiators have in your business or your daily life? Those are the sometimes subtle, or sometimes ‘in-your face’ things, that help each of us to make decisions through-out the days and weeks ahead.

A differentiator might be the color of a dress or the pattern on a necktie so far as clothing goes.  It might be the sweep of a body panel on that new automobile, or the interior trim option that you just had to have.  Differentiators can either be subtle or ‘in-your-face’.

WFA Staffing relies on differentiators every day.

We seek out those differences between various candidates that make the choice of one versus another apparent.  At the same time, we rely on differences to break ties between candidates.  Whether you think about that or not, they likely are part of your decision-making process as well as ours.

  It is for this reason that we pay a lot of attention to meeting you, our customer, on your turf.

We want to get to know you and your business.  Every business has a different something about it that resonates, which sets it apart from all the others in that same business.  Our visits in the field tell us a lot about the types of candidates that will fare better for each organization.

We strive to better understand who you are and what your company is and that is an immense help as we screen candidates, a number of whom are likely to have the qualifications but one or two of whom are simply better-suited for your needs in our opinion.  That is the real ‘magic’ of this business if there is any magic to it.  This also helps us save you time; we have gone through the process of sifting and winnowing and arrived at those who best fit the needs.

Our staff has years of experience in this differentiating process.  Visits with you on your ground help us to hone in on just the right set of attributes in the numerous people we interview.  Most of this experience is subtle; it is simply the way we do our ‘thing’ since it has proved to be best for us and our clients (both employers and prospective employees).  You might not be able to place your finger on it, but it is there nonetheless.

We look forward to the next opportunity you provide us in which we can show you how differentiation works to your benefit, too.

 
Al Campbell

 

 

 

 

The Saga of the Job Interview…


The saga of the Job Interview…

This phrase conjures up different thoughts for different people. The person being interviewed thinks about not making any serious gaffes.  The person conducting the interview thinks about not making any serious mistakes in the process of interviewing the prospective employee.

The result of these two sets of dynamics can be problematic even though both the interviewer and the interviewee felt they’d been at the top of their game during the interview.  The interviewer made sure to avoid causing the interviewee any discomfort during the interview and felt the process had gone well.

The interviewee felt he or she had done an excellent job of not making any serious errors during the interview.  True, he or she might’ve played a couple of games during the interview but that wouldn’t matter after he or she had been awarded the new position.  A little misdirection here and a bit of a falsehood there weren’t the end of the world, after all.

So, two relatively well-meaning people met and got along just fine.  They smiled at one and other, were courteous, received good answers or provided safe answers that seemed to fill the bill.  There weren’t a lot of people applying and there was pressure to fill the spot.

So, this interview led to an offer.  This led to an acceptance, which led to a termination a couple months later.

The approach used given the tight applicant market had only served to bring the interviewer back to filling that same position.  The person, who was released or had resigned, blemished his or her employment record given the short period of time in that job.

Enter WFA Staffing and its professional people people.  We interview as a profession, not as an interruption to the day’s usual routine.  We are good at what we do because that is what we do.  Our interviewing is an integral part of our day, not an interruption to be dealt with as quickly as possible.  We are tuned in to the people we work with as well as to the clients for whom we recruit.  This is what we do, all day every day of the work week.

You may think us a little strange. Our recruiters like what we do; we think it is a great profession and are happy to do that work. WFA strives to satisfy our client employers as well as being helpful to the people seeking employment.  And yes, we have likely heard most all the stories and our antennae are ever alert for the parts of the story that need further verification.

That’s what we do for our clients.  And if you’re not yet a WFA Staffing client, that’s what we’d love to do for you and your business.

Fred D'Amato

 

Fred D’Amato, President

 

SMILE!

smileWant to have a better today…SMILE!

 There is evidence that when we smile, even if we aren’t feeling it at that moment, we begin to feel better.

We can actually make ourselves feel better by smiling at others.  Now, wasn’t that easy?  When I receive a smile, I tend to automatically to return it.  If I am not ‘up to sorts’, I try to wear a smile and find that I work my way out of my funk and probably am helping others get out of their funk, too.

We don’t need to be goofy about it all.  A simple grin at another person will help you and the other person.  You might well find that you form a new habit.  You might also find that you develop a new friend or a deeper friendship.

We likemichael-phelps-happymichael-phelps-face-450 being around people who are happy.

We automatically work to stay out of the way of that guy or gal who is not happy almost as though we don’t want to catch whatever it is they’re having a problem getting beyond.

Be brutally honest with yourself and try to recall the last time you were in a funk.  Were people tending to stay away from you?  Did you continue to feed on your funk?  Did you ever get out of that funk all day, or did you take it home with you, too?

If you are seeking a new job, smile when you encounter anyone at the possible new place of employment, and continue to convey this positivity at all you encounter.  No one there wants to hire a sourpuss.  They probably already have their quota of bored, dreary,  or even scowling faces.

You don’t need to be happy-office-workeroverboard.

Just a simple show of your dimples, if you have those, is all it takes.  If you are about to interview with a person who has yet to find his or joy today, don’t go overboard but just smile a sincere smile as you introduce yourself.  You will almost be able to feel the atmosphere in the room changing for the better.

Another thing is very interesting, too.  When you are talking with a smile on your face that comes through even if you’re not in the same room with the person to whom you’re talking.  Your voice can convey the happiness on your face, just as it can convey the frown if that is pasted there.

If you are already a smiler, keep it up.

I have literally had people comment on my smile or lack of smile. If you smile once in a while, try to increase the frequency.   At the least, keep a happy thought in mind and that will begin to help you smile more often and you may find the people around are in a better mood too!

Tom Krist

 

 

Tom Krist, CEO

I lost one of my best friends this past year, who I truly miss.  He was a dear friend and a great mentor to me.  He helped me to get started in this business.  One of the things I remember most about my friend Jim is his wonderful, infectious, and memorable smile.  He could light up a room with that smile and he had the ability to smile in both good times and bad. This posting is in honor of Jim’s legacy.

Employment Equation

02d06a5  “The strongest pace of job growth we’ve seen since 1997” was the statement recently attributed to Paul Ashworth, the chief U.S. economist with Capitol Economics.  The U.S. Labor Department advised that employers added 257,000 new jobs in January, 2015 besting the forecast of 228,000.  Job growth estimates in November, 2014 were upwardly revised to 423,000, the most in 17 years.  December job growth estimates were increased to 329,000 up from the original estimate of 252,000.

There was a slight increase in average hourly earnings of $0.12 per hour in January, 2015 and that suggests the labor market is tightening.  What does all this mean for you and for us?  It may well mean that our job of finding the talent you need is going to get a bit more difficult, and it might mean that the talent we are able to locate will expect a bit more money in hourly wage or salary.  Predictions are that wage growth will continue into 2015, and that this is likely to show itself across all sectors.

You and we all have been here before.  When jobs are plentiful and labor is tight, the cost of new employees rises while the supply is obviously diminished.  When workers are more plentiful, the cost of employees holds steady or reduces.  We usually think of an expanding economy as being good for most of us, and that is our feeling with today’s news.

We’d rather participate in a growing economy and most of our client employers would prefer that as well.  If you are seeking a better job, give us a chance to help you with that search.  This is a great time to be seeking to improve your situation.  If you are seeking to add employees, this is also a great time since employees recognize this is a better job search market than they have seen for several years.

If you expect to need more employees, this is a good time to begin that search.  If you would like to confidentially explore the market for a new position, this is a good time to begin that effort, too.  We are ‘matchmakers’ and we are good at it.  We have had a lot of experience on both sides of this equation.

Let us hear from you.

Alan Campbell,  Account Manager

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Experience VS Pay

Experience VS Pay

We find the following quotation to be a truism in our business for it is the experience gained that hones the skills that lead to a better income for virtually all of us:

In the business world, everyone is paid in two coins: cash and experience. Take the experience first; the cash will come later. ~Harold Geneen

Our business is obviously that of finding the right people with the right skills and the right experience at the right price for the position we have been hired to fill by the employer-client.  That is anything but an easy job, especially if the person being recruited has a differing set of expectations than those we’re seeking in the ideal recruit.

Obviously we are between the proverbial rock and hard place if either the employer-client or the employee-candidate is not willing to accept the going price; that happens but it doesn’t happen as often as you might expect.

Among the reasons for that are the experience we have in this business.  We earned our experience the hard way; we worked at it, had the necessary disappointments along the way and got better and better at the business we chose to be involved with until we reached today.  We have many employer-clients with whom we’ve worked for years and we are thankful for those long-term relationships.

We are always interviewing new prospective placements and we are always anxious to interview, and be interviewed by, prospective new employer-clients.  If you are an employer in need of good people with the skill sets you require, we’d be proud to work for and with you.  We work in good faith rather than on retainer so we meet your needs or you bear no cost for our services.  We know that we need to perform well for you if we expect to have you as a repeat employer-client.  We recognize that if we do that repeatedly, your company might just be another of those employer-clients with whom we work regularly.  That would be good for us both, but we know that it is on us to earn that privilege.

 

Tom Krist – President

Tom Krist

 

Finding a Job is like Running a Marathon

 

 

Running Full Suit

Finding a job is like Running a Marathon!

I received a call last week from a great candidate, Jim, he had just completed an interview.  The candidate said it went great and he expected a job offer.  Sounds great I thought.  So, I called the client and asked how it went?  The client said great and they would be extending an offer to Bob. Hold on I said, what about Jim.  Jim didn’t quite have the attributes they were looking for.  So, it was time for another difficult call.  Not for me really, but for Jim.

How do you prepare for a call like that?  No one really can, but like a marathon runner, in order to even finish the race; we have to be ready for anything coming our way.

So prepare for each and every interview like it was a race you wanted to win.

First, study the company’s web site – all of it.  This is also a great place to find out how to dress for the interview.  It is ok to be a little overdressed but never underdressed.   Employers want to see that you have respect for the company and position that you are seeking.

Second, google the company and read any recent articles.  You will find out immediately about both the good and the bad and then you can prepare for it.

Third, if you know who you are talking to, check out their information on LinkedIn.  Immediately after the interview, connect with these people with LinkedIn.   So, yes this means you need to be on LinkedIn.  A must on this site is including a business like picture of you.

Fourth, just as important is to check out the people you are interviewing with on facebook.  Do not connect with them just see what they are interested in.  I would suggest not mentioning that you looked at their facebook pages but you can bet that the good HR people are checking yours out before you arrive.  Especially if they are interested in hiring you.

Is this starting to sound like a lot of work?  Well hopefully so because it is.  Believe me when I say company hiring executives are impressed when you tell them you like the company statement of purpose on the web site.  Remember the people you say that to are likely the ones that helped write it.  Sounds like a winner to me.  Thousands of people run marathons every year and many don’t finish.  Like getting a new job, none of the finishers get to the finish line without a great deal of preparation.

Finally if you don’t make it to the finish line, immediately start preparation for the next race. The race goes on whether or not you are in it, so get over the pain of losing and get ready for it.  Your competition is!

 

Todd Strehlow, CPA - WFA Staffing - Milwaukee, WI

Todd Strehlow – CFO